How to Make Organic Soy Milk & Tofu from Scratch!

Homemade soy milk is super easy to make and makes a great alternative to dairy milk. It requires only 2 ingredients: water and soybeans.

After finding some organic soybeans while shopping at my local bulk foods store, I thought I’d try my hand at making some soy milk!

I’ve made almost every type of plant milk under the sun; almond milk, cashew milk, hemp milk, macadamia milk, etc. and they all follow a similar process: soak nuts/seeds overnight, blend with some filtered water, strain and voila!

However, the process for making soy milk is a little different: you need to cook the milk before drinking it, as soy is a legume and can’t be eaten raw.

Yellow soybeans are recommended as they’re apparently “the best kind of soybeans to make soy milk” with. Always opt for organic, non-GMO soybeans in any case.

Before and after soaking the soybeans; they swell up to 3x their normal size.

You can use the leftover pulp (a.k.a Okara) from making the milk to whip up some other protein-rich, healthy recipes:

  • Use in stir-fries for added protein.
  • Use in baking as a gluten-free replacement for wheat flour. Replace 1 cup all-purpose flour with 1 cup dry Okara.
  • Use in hummus and other dips.
  • Use to make vegetarian patties, burgers or meatballs.
  • Substitute bread crumbs with Okara in meatloaf or use as a gluten-free crumb-coating for chicken and fish, etc.
  • Add to eggs or omelettes for breakfast.
  • Add to homemade granola for extra crunchy texture and a hit of protein.
  • Add to nice-cream or smoothie bowls.
  • Mix 1-2 tbsp in with smoothies.

No waste, plus multiple recipes in one!

Before we get started in learning how to make these super delicious organic soy milk & tofu recipes – if you like what you’re seeing, subscribe to my email newsletter at the bottom of the page to keep up to date on the latest recipes, DIYs, gardening and health tips I share!!

Okara leftover from making soy milk.

If you make this soy milk or tofu, please let me know! Leave a comment below, and if you take a picture and share it, please tag me on Instagram @simplynaturalnessa or use the hashtag #simplynaturalnessa so I can see! I’d love to know how you went!

DIY Soy Milk

Homemade soy milk will often last about 3-5 days in a sealed container in the fridge. However, if the milk smells, tastes or looks funky, do not drink it.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup organic dried soybeans
  • 3 cups water

Optional:

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp cacao powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2-3 medjool dates

To make:

  1. Soak the soybeans in water overnight, ideally 12 hours or longer. Drain and remove the outer skins; this gives the soy milk a much smoother texture, however it is optional.
  2. Add the soaked beans into a high-speed processor/blender for just 10-15 seconds to break down the seeds slightly.
  3. Blend the soybeans in a high speed blender with the water until smooth.
  4. Strain the blended mixture using a nut milk bag or cheesecloth, and store the pulp in an airtight container or jar in the fridge for use in other recipes.
  5. Pour the mixture into a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring often to prevent the milk sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the mixture starts boiling, allow it to cook for 3-4 minutes, and remove the foam that starts floating on top.
  6. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure nothing is sticking to the bottom of the pan. Turn the heat off and leave to cool for a few minutes. Here you can add other optional ingredients, and blend the milk again if necessary.
  7. Keep leftovers in a sealed glass jar or container in the fridge for about 3-5 days.
DIY soy milk made from soybeans, at home!

Soy milk can also be used to make tofu! Here’s how.

DIY soy milk tutorial

Homemade Tofu (with just Soy Milk, Water & Lemon!)

Make your own tofu at home with 3 ingredients; soybeans, fresh lemon juice and water!

When you make your own tofu:

  1. You can ensure it’s organic and non-GMO, and
  2. You can control how firm it is by adjusting how much you press the tofu; you can make silken, regular, firm or extra firm tofu.
My tofu press – it’s handmade from Etsy.

The types of coagulant most commonly used to make tofu are:

  • Gypsum – a natural calcium sulphate, it gives the tofu a sweeter taste.
  • Nigari – extracted from seawater.
  • Lemon juice – curdles the milk.

Lemon juice will act as the coagulant in this tofu recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups dry organic soybeans
  • 12 cups water
  • 1 1/2 lemons, juiced

To make:

  1. Soak the soybeans in water overnight, ideally 12 hours or longer. Drain and remove the outer skins; this gives the soy milk a much smoother texture, however it is optional.
  2. Add the soaked beans into a high-speed processor/blender for just 10-15 seconds to break down the seeds slightly.
  3. Blend the soybeans in a high speed blender with the water until smooth.
  4. Strain the blended mixture using a nut milk bag or cheesecloth, and store the pulp in an airtight container or jar in the fridge for use in other recipes.
  5. Pour the mixture into a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring often to prevent the milk sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the mixture starts boiling, add the lemon juice and remove the milk from heat.
  6. Stir gently through then set aside, you’ll see curdles start to form. If no curdles are forming, turn the heat on for a couple more minutes and add a little more lemon juice.
  7. Once the bowl is filled with curdles, put a nut milk bag or cheesecloth over a tofu mould or press and transfer the milk curdles with a skimmer spoon. Wrap the cloth tightly around the curdles, and allow the excess water to drain. Place a heavy object oven the cloth to press the tofu. This will firm up the tofu as the excess liquid drains.
  8. After 20 minutes, your firm tofu is ready. For a softer tofu, check after 5-10 minutes and continue to press as needed.
  9. Keep your tofu in an airtight container in the fridge for 3-4 days, stored in a little filtered water to prevent it drying out. You can press it again before using.
To the left; tofu that has been pressed with a proper tofu press. To the right; tofu that was pressed in a container. You can see the difference a good tofu press can make.

As always, this is not personal medical advice and we recommend that you talk with your doctor before trying or using any new products. It’s important to check with a doctor before taking this or any new product, especially if taking any other medicine or supplement or if pregnant or nursing. Be sure to check ingredients to make sure there is no risk of an allergic reaction.

Have you made soy milk or homemade tofu before? How did it go? Share in the comments below.

Lots of love,

🖤 Vanessa