How to make Coconut Wax & Beeswax Candles at Home

Did you know that that indoor air pollutants are often 2-5 times higher than outdoor levels, with some cases exceeding 100 times that of outdoor levels! Candles are one of the top contributors to indoor air pollution, as the most common types of candles, paraffin candles, which are derived from petroleum, can release chemicals like soot, toluene, benzene and other chemicals into the air when lit.

When I learnt this I quickly switched over to using only soy, beeswax and coconut wax candles, that used essential oils for scent rather than chemical fragrances. HOWEVER, I found them to be quite pricey, so decided to try my hand at making my own candles, and use repurposed jars collected from past products I’d purchased to hold the candles in (it’s a great way to upcycle glass jars, and you can style them up really tastefully!).

The first time I’d ever made beeswax candles, I was just over the moon with how well they turned out! I found these jars from the $2 shop.

Paraffin candles should be avoided as they do more harm than good to the quality of the air inside your home. Pure beeswax candles, on the other hand, do not. They can actually improve the air quality in your house! How? Glad you asked 😉 Pure beeswax candles burn with nearly no scent or smoke and actually clean the air by releasing negative ions into it, just like salt lamps do. The negative ions bind with toxins and remove them from the air, helping to purify it!

People with asthma or allergies may find beeswax candles especially helpful as they’re good at removing common allergens like dander, dust and mould from the air. Beeswax candles also last a lot longer than paraffin ones because they burn at a much slower rate.

Beeswax candles help to purify air by binding to pollen, dust, and toxins, and drawing them out, helping to clean the air around them! During the first burn of your new beeswax candles, keep the candles lit for at least 2.5 hours, or preferably, until the entire surface has melted. This helps stop the candles from “tunnelling”.

Have I sold ya on them yet? 😉

If you’re as keen as I was to try your hand at making some clean, all natural beeswax, soy or coconut wax candles, look no further! You’ve come to the right place. Here’s how to make them.

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DIY Beeswax Candles

Beeswax burns very hot so it can be challenging when it comes to finding the right combination between the wick and your jar. By blending the beeswax with a softer oil, it helps to bring down the melting point of the candle. Why would we want to do this? It helps create a mix that’s slightly softer which will allow for a more even burn. Just make sure it’s not too soft, or your candle will burn away too quickly. So you want to find the happy medium.

Mixing beeswax with an oil like coconut oil, can help soften the wax and allow for a more even burn of the wax, helping to prevent “tunnelling”.

Just a note about beeswax candles: it’s totally fine to use only beeswax, but just be aware that if you choose to do this, your wick will ‘tunnel” down into the wax and you’ll be left with a ring of wax around the inside of your jar that won’t burn. Don’t worry if this happens to you though, you can simply melt it down again once the wick is gone, and rework into a new candle!

Also! Pure beeswax often tends to crack if the candle cools down too quickly. This shouldn’t affect it’s ability to burn and function, but some people are put off by its aesthetic appeal afterwards. I read from Wellness Mama that if you set the finished candle down into warm water, it will cool much more slowly, preventing any cracking that may have occurred.

Halfway through setting; you can see the colour change in the wax, as it starts to set and harden into a candle!!

The following recipe is originally from Wellness Mama, and I swear by it as it’s worked great for me when I’ve made beeswax candles. She went though a lot of testing to find the best combo of oil, beeswax and wick (which has now saved me the trial and error of figuring that out for myself!).

Word of caution: beeswax is flammable so please take care with it and keep an eye on it while it’s heating. You do NOT want to forget about it and let it get too hot or spill it on your hot stove.

I had a blast making these beeswax candles, and felt really proud of what I’d created at the end; a clean, natural candle source that not only looks beautiful but helps clean indoor air!! You can add essential oils like lavender to these candles to give them a beautiful, calming scent!

Last note (I promise): Beeswax is very difficult to remove from surfaces. In my household I’ve designated a few tools that I use specifically for beeswax and other oil-based products so I don’t have to scrub them too much to ensure they’re completely clean. It just removes the need to clean these tools between uses. I use the same tools for candles, lip balms and other products and just melt and remove as much of the wax/oils as I can between uses.

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Place the beeswax in your allocated pitcher or coffee can.
  2. Put pitcher in the pot and fill with enough water to cover the outside of the pitcher (without allowing it to spill over into the pitcher). The water will need to boil, so keep that in mind when filling up the pot, as you don’t want to fill it too high that the water bubbles into the pitcher.
  3. Bring water to a boil, then keep it at a gentle boil until all the beeswax has melted.
  4. While you’re waiting for the beeswax to melt, you can get started on preparing the wicks! Cut 3-4 pieces 6 inches long. It can be a good idea to have an extra wick ready on hand, just in case you make more wax than you thought.
  5. Once the beeswax has completely melted, remove from heat and add the coconut oil. Stir gently with a bamboo skewer until the coconut oil has melted and incorporated into the wax.
  6. Pour a small amount of the wax mix into the bottom of each jar so that there is about a half-inch at the bottom. Return the pitcher to the hot water to ensure the wax stays melted (as soon as it’s taken off heat and starts to cool, it will begin to solidify).
  7. Place a wick down into the wax in the centre of each jar. You can use a skewer to make sure it’s placed securely and correctly in the jar by pushing down on the wick and holding it there for a few minutes.
  8. Let the wax cool until it has become solid enough to hold the wick in place, approximately 5-10 minutes.
  9. Wrap the top end of the wick around a bamboo skewer until it’s taut with the skewer resting across the top of the jar. You might need to use a small piece of tape to keep the wick from slipping off of the skewer.
  10. Hold onto the skewer and pour the remaining melted wax into each jar. Leave about an inch of space at the top.
  11. Reposition the skewer holding the wick as needed so that it’s still sitting in the centre of the jar.
  12. Let it cool completely, this may take a few hours but I usually leave them overnight.
  13. Trim the wick to about 1/2 inch. Do not trim it any shorter than this because it’ll make a smaller flame and is more likely to make the candle “tunnel”. When you light the candle, if it’s flickering wildly or smoking, simply blow it out, trim the wick a little bit more and re-light. This should help.
  14. During the first burn keep your candle lit for at least 2.5 hours, or preferably, until the entire surface has melted.
Before and after the beeswax candles have finished setting! Once set, you can trim the wick and they’re ready to light!!

Now, if you’re looking to vary your up your candles, here’s how to make a coconut wax candle!!

DIY Coconut Wax Candles

This recipe is originally from Sheri Vegas. Coconut wax is a great wax to use as the scent tends to last longer in this type of wax than others, especially when using essential oils, which can sometimes have a weak scent in other types of candles due to how little of the essential oil can safely be imbued in them.

Let’s get started!

Ingredients:

  • Coconut bowl (for aesthetic appeal) OR glass jars (can reuse and upcycle old jars!)
  • Wood wicks, size 2 (if using coconut bowl – the size of the wick will vary depending on size of your coconut bowl) OR 60 ply cotton braided wick #4, cut into 6 inch pieces (if using glass jars)
  • 5- 20 drops coconut and lime essence (can simply mix coconut and lime essential oils) – optional
  • 1/2 cup organic coconut wax (make sure to pre-shred it, as it usually comes in a bar)
  • 1 1/2 cups organic soy wax (make sure to pre-shred it if not already shredded)

Instructions:

  1. Place the soy and coconut wax in a large bowl. Coconut wax has a low core temperature of 43°C, so it will only melt above that.
  2. Put bowl on top of saucepan full of water (to create a kind of double broiler).
  3. Bring water to a boil, then keep it at a gentle boil until all the wax has melted. Next, add in your essence OR essential oils (if using).
  4. While you’re waiting for the wax to melt, you can get started on preparing the wicks! Cut 3-4 pieces 6 inches long (if using glass jars). It can be a good idea to have an extra wick ready on hand, just in case you make more wax than you thought.
  5. Once the wax has completely melted, remove from heat, pour a small amount of the wax mix into the bottom of each jar OR coconut bowl, so that there is about a half-inch at the bottom. Return the bowl to the hot water to ensure the wax stays melted (as soon as it’s taken off heat and starts to cool, it will begin to solidify).
  6. Place a wick down into the wax in the centre of each jar. You don’t have to use the wood wicks if using a coconut bowl, you can use the regular wicks if you like, it just gives it a better aesthetic look. You can use a skewer to make sure it’s placed securely and correctly in the jar by pushing down on the wick and holding it there for a few minutes.
  7. Let the wax cool until it has become solid enough to hold the wick in place, approximately 5-10 minutes.
  8. Wrap the top end of the wick around a bamboo skewer until it’s taut with the skewer resting across the top of the jar. You might need to use a small piece of tape to keep the wick from slipping off of the skewer.
  9. Hold onto the skewer and pour the remaining melted wax into each jar. Leave about an inch of space at the top.
  10. Reposition the skewer holding the wick as needed so that it’s still sitting in the centre of the jar.
  11. Let it cool completely, this may take a few hours but I usually leave it overnight.
  12. Trim the wick to about 1/2 inch. Do not trim it any shorter than this because it’ll make a smaller flame. When you light the candle, if it’s flickering wildly or smoking, simply blow it out, trim the wick a little bit more and re-light. This should help.
  13. During the first burn keep your candle lit for at least 2.5 hours, or preferably, until the entire surface has melted.

Make sure to tag me if you make it @simplynaturalnessa, I’d absolutely love to see your creations!

Beeswax & coconut wax candle recipe tutorial

Have you made your own candles before? Do you prefer beeswax, coconut wax or soy wax candles? If you have a favourite candle recipe, share below! We’d love to try it out too!

Lots of love,

🖤 Vanessa

Source:

Hobbs, Jordan. (April 16, 2020). 3 Benefits of Coconut Wax Candles. Heiroma. Retrieved from https://heiroma.com/blogs/news/benefits-coconut-wax-candles